Posts Tagged 21st century skills

How is that brain of yours doing?

Crikey! It seems my brain is in dire need of a break.  Hows yours feeling when you look at the stats in this infographic.  Infographics – they are everywhere aren’t they?  I can’t help but analyse my own online behaviour after having a look at this.  I currently have 6 tabs open, I have a chat window open on one of those tabs and an email and twitter programme running in the background. The phone has rung three times tonight and I’ve had four texts.  My poor partner trying to have a conversation with me at the same time while I’m so distracted.  My poor brain!

I totally relate to the email problem.  I’ve come to the point where I turn mine off if I’m trying to do something complicated and get it completed at work.  Working on a document with email flashing away as a new message arrives is the ultimate distraction.  Worse than a phone call which deals with something immediately a fresh shiny email can cause me to feel the burden of yet another job to do, or something which I need to think about.  So, right at the bottom in the what you can do section are the answers for me.  Turn the technology off, devote specific times to specific tasks and stop trying to do too many things at once.  Nobody is that good at multi-tasking it seems, even us women!

I got it from Stephen Abrams here

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Dewey 398.2

Oh yes, myths and legends!

I love this Thinglink from Librarians On The Fly.  My new fave blog.

There was a question recently on the listserv about how to choose books for senior students, there was a deluge of responses with suggestions of ways and means.  This image has some answers to that question.  Also, in the ‘This irritates me constantly department’ I always resent it when people assume that I have time to read during paid work hours.  Seriously?  Haven’t you looked into my workroom, that mass of paper, books half processed, projects half completed, displays half put up, planners all over the show, timetables being adjusted.  Oh and look I’m not in my workroom, I spend at least half of every day out working with teachers and students in their classes.  Oh how I’d love the time to sit in a cosy chair and read at school – oh wait that is what I set it up for the students to do!  Lucky sods.

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Information Fluency

This is awesome.  Hover over the  diagram and links will appear, if that doesn’t happen then go to the source here  or the Thinglink here.  Each of the embedded links takes you to really useful help section where you can learn how to teach each of the skills, there are lesson plans, posters and all manner of useful tools.  The detail is fantastic and I’ll be spending some time on their pages.  I for one salute you 21st Century Information Fluency Project.  

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Core Education – Data Engagement explained

Got lots of new devices heading your way?  I’m betting they are heading towards you even if they aren’t there yet.  How will your library manage them, will they change the way you teach students to engage with information?  Will you have to scramble to catch up or will you embrace them and learn the new tricks so that you can be one step ahead of your students?  Do you need to be one step ahead of the students?  Could they be teaching you new tricks?  Head over to the Core Education blog, plenty to see other there today as they explore data engagement and what it means for education.  They don’t think much about the library in particular over at Core, but they do look at the trends and some of these trends are going to definitely impact on libraries in education.

Today I was being told about a Livescribe.  I started to think about the impact that would have on special needs students in our school.  Yet more engagement with data, yet more data to carry around in your pocket along with your other devices.

Stand back folks, more clever stuff heading your way, into your schools and therefore into your libraries.  While you are over there be sure to watch Hans Rosling, he is my maths crush!

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The Horizon Report 2012

It’s out.  One of the reports worth paying attention to.

The New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) jointly released the NMC Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition. This ninth edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, a decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education. Six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, as well as key trends and challenges expected to continue over the same period, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning.

This one, and the Core Trends in Education would be great to share with your staff and SMTs. Even if your school isn’t adopting mobile technology or Game Based Learning yet, you can bet that at least some of your staff will be paying attention.  Link to the report here.

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Ten trends in education 2012

Every year Core Education puts out it’s list of the Ten Trends it sees emerging in education  and it is fresh out now for this year.  Head on over to their website for full details and to see the list expanded and explained but the list is as follows.

  1. Open-ness by Derek Wenmoth, Director (Feb)
  2. Ubiquitious Learning
  3. Personalisation
  4. Smart Web
  5. Citizenship
  6. Virtual Learning
  7. Data Engagement
  8. Thinking 3D
  9. Social Learning
  10. User + Control

Some of these are the same trends as last year but there are a couple of new ones.

 

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Getting to grips with Google Reader

I know that many many readers of this blog will use Google Reader every day, but many of the teaching staff I talk to, and librarians too for that matter, wonder at the ability of some of us to munch through so many blogs, gleaning good stuff and sharing it around.  Google Reader makes it easy.

The RSS feed is the key to all this blog reading goodness.

Sue Waters has written a really great explanation of how to manage your blog reading life using RSS feeds and Google Reader. If you struggle to keep up with online reading, or you are looking for a clear introduction to using Google Reader then her article is certain to help you.

You will find it here.  You will also find all kinds of good things on the blog, it is specifically for people using Edublogs but even though I don’t use that platform I find lots of really good things on The Edublogger.

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Should You Use Twitter?

Dan Martell from Flowtown created this fabulous and funny-as flow diagram to help you decide whether you should be using Twitter or not

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The Coach in the Library

This article is doing the rounds on the Australian School Library Listsev at the moment.  It makes good reading and would certainly provide a nice meaty musing for someone who was wanting to prove their worth in the school library.  The article is mainly talking about primary (elementary) level school libraries but works equally well at secondary level.

“Although the classroom teacher is generally the expert on the content standards, the school librarian is the expert on the process of finding, evaluating, using, creating, and sharing information. Bringing the two together engenders powerful learning opportunities for students and provides professional development to teachers.

After all, part of ensuring that students and teachers have access to the resources of the library is making sure teachers know how to use these resources to enhance instruction. I have been a school librarian/media specialist for 14 years. Throughout my career, I’ve seen many librarians—including myself—guide teachers by modeling how to use cutting-edge resources, leading small-group presentations, and providing one-on-one instruction.”

The final paragraph of the article should give those who think they can do more to engage with their staff a little to mull over

In these hard economic times, schools must use each staff member to the fullest. School librarians have great knowledge about 21st century skills, technology, literacy, and much more. Schools should take advantage of the opportunities this knowledge store can create and run with them—for the benefit of our students.

This is the key.  Are you doing all you can?  Have you upskilled yourself?  Have you really engaged with the school ICT PD?  Are you out there selling your new and well developed skills?  Do you know what topics are being taught in every subject, and do you have the print resources, and the online resources to cater for your staff and student needs in these areas? Do you REALLY talk to your staff, not just in the staff room over a cuppa, but a meaningful discussion on how you can help support the curriculum?

If you have rested on your laurels and waited for technology to come and find you instead of making it your business to get out there and get into it yourself you are going to get left behind, and if you are not relevant to what your students and staff need, you should be seriously worried about your job.

What do you think?  How easy is it to engage with your teaching staff about what you can do for them?  Do you have some good examples of what has worked for you?  Teachers, can you offer suggestions?

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Jenica Rogers – Reality-based Librarianship for Passionate Librarians

It was with great expectations that I travelled down to Whangarei Tuesday afternoon to listen to American librarian Jenica Rogers. Jenica is to be a keynote speaker at the LIANZA Conference next week in Wellington, but she had been persuaded to “practice” her talk up North. This was a wonderful opportunity for us in the far North to to learn from such a motivated and indeed, passionate, librarian.

Jenica’s session, Reality-based Librarianship for Passionate Librarians was fabulous. Her focus was on  how to implement a new project within your library, whether it is a new technique, technology, event, change or concept, the process is the same. Her projects she conceptualised as mountains or hills, and she discussed how we must be completely committed, passionate enough to climb those mountains and achieve our goals. Jenica talked about naming your passion, identifying your goals and professionally organising, planning and managing towards achieving them. Embrace the process she said, even if you have to compromise on the way, it is all about focusing and following your passions, achieving those goals, creating a better environment or service. But that you can’t do it alone, so build a support network, look for allies or flock mates, utilise the power of community.

Jenica also made us consider failure and how to deal with it, when to recognise that this project will not be achievable and climb back down the mountain. “Success requires some tolerance for failure” she stated, and challenged us to plan ahead about things that may go wrong and how we would handle it.

Jenica reminded me of one of our own passionate advocates for libraries, Donna Watt from Invercargill, (view Donna’s blog – Half Pint of Wisdom), they speak the same language with the same message – they really need to be flock-mates!

Thanks to Corin of LIANZA Hikuwai  for organising this inspirational session for us. And thank you, Jenica Rogers, for exceeding my expectations and presenting an inspirational reality-based session.

To learn more about Jenica Rogers, start with her blog Attempting Elegance, and if you have the chance to hear her speak at the LIANZA conference, don’t miss it.

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