Posts Tagged Libraries

Working with your talents

Many Hands! Image: 'many hands …'  http://www.flickr.com/photos/11685418@N00/8268352781 Found on flickrcc.net

Many Hands!
Image: ‘many hands …’
http://www.flickr.com/photos/11685418@N00/8268352781
Found on flickrcc.net

Long time no write anything on this blog, but I have been doing a lot of reading of others blogs so here is a reblog of a post I really appreciated on Megan Ingle’s Audacious Fizz blog.

Why did this blogpost ring so true to me?  Well that is because, like any small organisation, the one I devote large amounts of my free time to is an organisation which thrives on people standing up and offering skills, vision and time, and sometimes those things seem a little thin on the ground.  Plenty of folk clamor for new things, new initiatives, new tools from our organisation but very few put their hands up to help make them happen.  I really liked what this blog post had to say about getting involved, that talent comes in many forms and that people’s strengths are often where new cool ideas are to be found.  Yes, the collective is stronger than the individual.

The collective is stronger than the individual.

We’ve all got something we can contribute to a shared outcome. If a stronger profession is what we want, then why don’t we all bring our strengths to the cause?

So, be bold, put your hand up.  Come up with a good idea and offer to drive it.  Mentor someone, what do you feel the burn for?  What would you love to see happen?  Together we can make awesome happen, alone it takes an age, is not as much fun and doesn’t offer you the opportunity to learn new skills and connect with others who share your skills and passion.  Say yes!  Say why not!  Say ‘hey I’ve got a good idea!’

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Who sees what you do?

Reading this article in the School Library Journal reminded me of a recent conversation with some English teachers at a conference where I presented on the topic of How To Get a Kick Ass Librarian. Those teachers told me that they really didn’t understand what it was that their librarian did all day. They told me that mostly their librarians were in their workroom and mostly sitting at their computers, even when there were classes in the librarie, and that they wouldn’t think of asking them for help finding them or the students resources, they didn’t seem to think that their librarians would want that.  Frankly, I was shocked!

I asked the teachers what they thought the librarians were doing on their computers and they told me that they had no idea.  One even told me she had worked in the librarians office for a period of weeks in order to find out what the librarian did all day and at the end of that time was no wiser. They told me that the librarians very rarely came out of their workrooms and then only to tidy shelves and maintain the library.  They said they thought there was a complete lack of understanding of what librarians did.  I think there is a complete misunderstanding of what librarians can do!

This is a problem though.  I investigated further.  I spoke to English teachers at our school.  I asked them if they had experienced ‘the librarian is in the workroom and is staying there syndrome’  and there was an overwhelming yes response to that.  They suggested that it is not normal practice in schools for librarians to be out in the library assisting them and their students.  So, all the current talk in SLANZA circles about EBP and proving how what you do makes a difference to teaching and learning in your school is for naught if school librarians are not out in the library and making that difference, but instead are sitting in front of their computers doing …. something that is probably very useful to them, but not to the students and teachers they are supporting.  And we are support staff, we are supposed to be supporting those people.  Yes through resourcing the library (perhaps that is what some of that computer time is about) but also through working with the staff at your school, alongside them and therefore alongside the students – you know the ones whose learning you are supposed to be making a difference to.  You aren’t going to make any difference to them at all if you sit in your office all day.  Yes you have to do the cataloguing, the processing and all those other library business things, but you have to make a difference and the only way you’ll do that is to get out there and be with the people using the library.

Image: ‘Lego Blogger Picture’
http://www.flickr.com/photos/25969181@N00/375779781
Found on flickrcc.net

Now I’m not suggesting that you are a teacher, or even a teacher aide.  I am suggesting that you are the best resource in the library.  That you know heaps of stuff about what you have in there, where you can get more, that you are a key person with a distinct role in the school, come on folks, talk yourselves up, get out of the office and live up to the talk.  You know your school needs you, needs your skills, needs the resources you provide.  Get out, sell yourself, sell your services and get out of that workroom.  You can do the workroom stuff when classes are not in the library.

So who does see what you do?  Is it only you?  Who would notice if you didn’t do what you do?  How many of those things you’ve always done are vital to the students and teachers experience of the library?  Have a think about it.

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Dewey 398.2

Oh yes, myths and legends!

I love this Thinglink from Librarians On The Fly.  My new fave blog.

There was a question recently on the listserv about how to choose books for senior students, there was a deluge of responses with suggestions of ways and means.  This image has some answers to that question.  Also, in the ‘This irritates me constantly department’ I always resent it when people assume that I have time to read during paid work hours.  Seriously?  Haven’t you looked into my workroom, that mass of paper, books half processed, projects half completed, displays half put up, planners all over the show, timetables being adjusted.  Oh and look I’m not in my workroom, I spend at least half of every day out working with teachers and students in their classes.  Oh how I’d love the time to sit in a cosy chair and read at school – oh wait that is what I set it up for the students to do!  Lucky sods.

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Without libraries we’d be dumb!

Daniel Handler and Maria Kelman who have written the book Why we broke up, are seen in this video singing an ode to libraries.  Sing it loud and sing it proud!

When you’ve finished singing along go check out the Tumblr for Why We Broke Up.

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Virtual tour of Australian school libraries

OH WOW!

Judith Way – one of my library heroines (read more about her here) has achieved this grand feat. A fantastic inside view of lots of Australian School libraries.  Just WOW!

I found out about this from here (another great blog I follow called Brave New World – it’s all kinds of awesome too)

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Tiny House Libraries – The Little Free Library Initiative

The Little Free Library organisation is all about sharing books within your community. These tiny house libraries originate from Madison, Wisconsin, USA and are now dotted around the USA (see map).

They come in a variety of styles and costs to suit all budgets, but really, anyone may set up a small box, making it weatherproof if it is outside, fill it with a few books to share, then tell friends and neighbours . . . like the ‘Pay It Forward’ concept. People may take a book and exchange it for another.

What an excellent scheme to encourage reading.

Source: Judy O’Connell, Hey Jude

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You too could smell like your library!

In The Library Perfume

CB I hate Perfume have produced these rather gorgeous bottles containing the scent of the library.  Hmmm well if your library is full of teenage boys as mine is I’m not sure that it would have any kind of appeal – the smell of damp, sweaty, woollen socks wouldn’t rate highly with me.

They think a library smells like –

In the Library is a warm blend of English Novel*, Russian & Moroccan Leather Bindings, Worn Cloth and a hint of Wood Polish

*The main note in this scent was copied from one of my favorite novels originally published in 1927.  I happened to find a signed first edition in pristine condition many years ago in London.  I was more than a little excited because there were only ever a hundred of these in the first place.  It had a marvelous warm woody slightly sweet smell and I set about immediately to bottle it.

 

 

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