Modern Authors With Longevity

I was intrigued by this post on Bookriot.  And thought, seeing as it is months since I put anything on this blog, that I might bring it to the attention of the 5 people who are still following along.  Sorry for abandoning you for so long.  I’d say posts might become more frequent but my busy life keeps interfering with my wish to have an active blog.  And the other contributor on here is in the same boat.  Damn that interesting life we keep leading!

Anyway over on Bookriot they have suggested the 10 authors who will still be read and revered in 100 years.  I was wondering if my list would agree with theirs, they seem to have a bent towards the USA and I’d like some others on there.  And I’d like to extend their list, while not arguing with the choices they have made, even though I haven’t heard of George Saunders and I can’t stand Juno Diaz’s work – I’ve tried, really I have.

Anyway I’d add to the list:

Mary Doria Russell – every book a winner.  She writes all kinds of things, history, science fiction, westerns and they are all thoughtful, beautifully written and take you on a journey to another place and time.  She is my favourite author overall amongst a plethora of others whom I also love.  She is my desert island author.

Ian McEwan – This guy is just so good.  He takes a topic and makes a story work around it.  I haven’t loved every book (I give you Solar) (and raise you Amsterdam) but when he gets it right I think he is unbeatable.

Patrick Ness – Oh yes you scoffers at YA literature, take this and shove it up your jumper, this is the best writer in the field and I can assure you that his books have as much appeal for adults as they do for kids.  He is a make you cry kind of guy, making you cry with relief when a character survives and howl as he kills a dog.

Tim Winton – every time I read one of his books I know I’m going to have attachment issues.  I’ll hate and love and care about the people I’m reading about.  I will become so involved in their lives that I will dream about them.  Realness is his thing, and for me that is so refreshing and it is all so unstilted that I can’t help getting caught up in his stories.  I’ve got the latest to read and I’m waiting for a chance to sit, do nothing but just read it.

Ann Patchett – she writes in the way that I’d like to talk.  State of Wonder is a treasure, but so is Bel Canto. She sees with a clear eye and she makes me totally connect with the ideas she is sharing.  I love the big ideas she puts into her novels.  Her essays are wonderful.  She is a real bookie and if she is recommending a book I know I will love it.

Kate Atkinson – I’m a little in love with Kate.  I love her very British way of seeing the world, the dark side of life as well as the bright.  She writes character so well, her latest book was so cleverly constructed it made me want to start it again immediately I had finished.  Her books are treasures and her Jackson Brodie the best of the British detectives and that is high praise indeed.

So, I could go on.  These are the grown up authors I love.  There are so many more.  But these are the top of the pops for me. Anyone want to add some more?

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Who should decide what kids read – kids I reckon

Here is a great article from The Guardian, called Who Decides What I Get To Read.  It is written by ABitCrazy a kid.  I think thats awesome.  There is a real place for the kids voice in a discussion like this.  It goes with Judy Blume’s comments here in The Telegraph.

I love Patrick Ness’s comments about how he read everything and everything as a kid.  One thing that makes me really uncomfortable at the moment is the compulsion that my students feel to constantly read series books.  So limiting!  Yesterday I took one of the Yr 10s who cannot cope if the next book in the series he is reading for a tour of the library to show him lots and lots of series he hasn’t ever read, and also to talk about how if you are waiting for the next book there are so many good stand alone books.

But back to the original article.  Lots of parents in the survey mentioned would buy more books if they had age recommendations on them.  I am so against this.  I signed up to No Age Banding when it first started ages ago, and I see age recommendations creeping onto books more and more often.  Severely limiting the appeal of a book.  I just can’t see a 14 year old wanting to read a book recommended to a 10 year and up audience.  Let kids choose what they want to read.  Wise librarians and booksellers who are wide and up to date in their reading can recommend books.  You don’t need a band on the spine.  Let kids choose for themselves.

I quite liked Kate De Goldi’s recommendations today in Booknotes Unbound.  A great big long list of books which I’m sure some conservative parents would take issue with but which really are awesome crossover reads, I’d add lots more recent books to the list, books like Broken by Daniel Clay, The Universe versus Alex Woods by Gavin Extence, anything by Matthew Quick, books by Sue Monk Kid, Karen Thompson’s Age of Miracles and a bunch of other stuff which is recent and full of awesome.

Let them read, let them read widely and stop judging what is good for them and what isn’t.  Oh and read Bugs!

That is my rant for this evening.

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The 40 Best YA Novels

Here is a list.  A really interesting list. From Rolling Stone Magazine no less.Image

Unfortunately it is horrible to view, but that is probably it’s only fault.  Some books I hadn’t heard of and will go hunting for.  Some books which are  books I’ve loved for years.  Check
it out here
!   Here is the blurb from the site.

In the past decade, young adult literature has gone from a loosely defined term describing books marketed to teenagers to a cultural force that has spawned such blockbuster hits as TwilightThe Hunger GamesDivergent and The Fault in Our Stars (all of which have been made into movies, with Fault hitting theaters on June 6th). Trying to decide on the most essential books in the genre is a bit like trying to empty the ocean using a thimble. We’ve parsed through hundreds of stories about dystopian societies, supernatural love triangles, awkward first crushes and many a mixed-tape featuring the Smiths to bring you this core collection of classic staples and overlooked gems. Consider it your summer reading list. By Anna Fitzpatrick

 

 

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Collection Development – know your users

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I have been shocked recently with the trend of school librarians seeking opinions about books and regularly asking for others opinions on books they are thinking of buying for their libraries on listserv and on social media.  I have always thought that one of the joys of running a library, especially one where you are so connected with your users, such as in a school library, that buying books which specifically appeal to your students is easy.  Why ask someone who doesn’t know your users?  Why ask someone who doesn’t work in a school at the same level as you?  Why are you so scared of buying something which you could easily send back if it doesn’t fit?  Yes budgets are tight.  Yes, sometimes you make a mistake? I’ve just finished a book which I should not have bought, thank goodness I read it before it hit the hands of a Yr 9 boy – far too much graphic sex.   But you have to have some confidence in yourself.  Decide that you know your existing stock, that you know what you need in the library, that you have great selection tools and do some research yourself.  That is what librarians do.  Don’t think that by posting on the listserv that you will get opinions from people which will match yours, you might get me, and I might tell you to go to a bookshop and have a look for yourself.  I might tell you to look at the blogs or at Goodreads to see what other people are saying about the books you are considering.  I might tell you that it is your job to know what will work for your students and staff.

Why are you so unwilling to take a punt on books which have been nominated for awards? Which have been compared to a heap of others which fit the same category of reader – junior fiction (if you are an intermediate school you are going to want those right) Senior Fiction is much more tricky I admit.  There are always some I don’t buy because they don’t fit (too girly or ugly cover so nobody will borrow it, we already have 16 of this kind of book and don’t need any more there are plenty of reasons a book won’t work for me, but I can tell by looking.  So can you!) but New Zealand kids need to read NZ books, they need to read the best of the bunch.  And I’m happily going to say that one of the best NZ kids books I read last year wasn’t on the list of NZ Post Books and I was gutted about that, but I can push that book to my kids and not everyone can be a finalist.  Kids need to read a variety of books and they don’t only need to read your taste.  Maybe you are someone who likes ‘lovely’ books.  Old fashioned charmers.  Well you can’t just buy ‘old fashioned charmers’ for your school library.  Peter Rabbit is all very well and good but your kids don’t live in England in the 1960s they live in NZ in the 2000s.  They are not you when you were a kid.  Read some new books.  Read what is on the lists.  Learn to love the modern.  Or you should consider looking for another job.

School librarians are hip, they are down with the cool kids, they love new, they love cool and they love kids and they most of all get kids.  If you get kids then you know what to buy them.  Stop asking the world to do your job.  Get on the blogs, follow cool school librarians from all over the world, look up reading lists, follow Zac HardingLorraine Orman and Bob Docherty, join Goodreads and look for other school librarians and see what they love.  Look at what is hot all around the world, what is winning awards, what are people raving about.  It is the joy of finding gems that you didn’t know about before by hunting around that makes me happy.

Mostly though, you should be a librarian.  Good at choosing, good at researching and good at reading books for kids!

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Tween Reading List – now thats handy!

tweensIt is booklist time of year again, one of my favourite times,  I keep adding to my most wanted in 2014 lists and finding new ways of spending the budget I want to have, not necessarily the budget I will have.

The ALSC – Association for Library Service to Children have put out a Tween Booklist.  You know those kids, the ones who look like teenagers, act like teenagers and are little kids inside even if they don’t realise it.  You can download the PDF in either black and white or colour which I think is just excellent and it makes good browsing.

Find it here.  While you are on their website check out some of the other fantastic things they have on there.  Very inspiring!

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Dame Judy Dench on the Power of Language

What’s not to love about this incredible woman?

Judy Dench

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Working with your talents

Many Hands! Image: 'many hands …'  http://www.flickr.com/photos/11685418@N00/8268352781 Found on flickrcc.net

Many Hands!
Image: ‘many hands …’
http://www.flickr.com/photos/11685418@N00/8268352781
Found on flickrcc.net

Long time no write anything on this blog, but I have been doing a lot of reading of others blogs so here is a reblog of a post I really appreciated on Megan Ingle’s Audacious Fizz blog.

Why did this blogpost ring so true to me?  Well that is because, like any small organisation, the one I devote large amounts of my free time to is an organisation which thrives on people standing up and offering skills, vision and time, and sometimes those things seem a little thin on the ground.  Plenty of folk clamor for new things, new initiatives, new tools from our organisation but very few put their hands up to help make them happen.  I really liked what this blog post had to say about getting involved, that talent comes in many forms and that people’s strengths are often where new cool ideas are to be found.  Yes, the collective is stronger than the individual.

The collective is stronger than the individual.

We’ve all got something we can contribute to a shared outcome. If a stronger profession is what we want, then why don’t we all bring our strengths to the cause?

So, be bold, put your hand up.  Come up with a good idea and offer to drive it.  Mentor someone, what do you feel the burn for?  What would you love to see happen?  Together we can make awesome happen, alone it takes an age, is not as much fun and doesn’t offer you the opportunity to learn new skills and connect with others who share your skills and passion.  Say yes!  Say why not!  Say ‘hey I’ve got a good idea!’

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